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Albedo.jpg

Albedo is a Tower that appears in the Solecism series.

History[]

Albedo makes his first appearance In the fifth volume of the Outer Roads (Solecism III). He confronts Sincere and Bryan Williams during their quest to wake up Akasha. However, he is effortlessly sealed away by Christopher Sincere Pride, who sensed his presence. Sincere simply created an equation that could answer the equation of anything that is omni, and used it to perfectly bind a perfect infinity to a finite equation, making Albedo's current status: Sealed.

Powers and Abilities[]

Albedo is a Tower, meaning this power level is higher than that of the Gods.

Albedo is a Tower is essentially and necessarily "harmonized" with the 'Omniversal vibrational frequency' of the concept of a perfect "infinity" that transcends the transfinite numbers, essentially being one with all of it, and above it. He is essentially omnipotent, omniscient, and omnipresent; all-encompassing in power, knowledge, and presence, regardless of the Omniverse, reality, or dimension.

When he made his appearance, as he stood, there he was, all-encompassing throughout a continuum of Omniverses, never ceasing.

Albedo being a ‘Tower’ simply meant that he had absolute power over everything that has been created in the fictional and nonfictional realities (and the absolute infinite multiplicity amount never mentioned, seen, or even conceived of yet…). There were no boundaries, or metaphenomena that he did not establish or transcend, for he stood to high for any barriers to even reach his feet. Albedo was the absolute quantification of an absolute infinity, being without the necessity or essentiality of 0 and ∞. He was before the fact of the First Principle, and after the fact of the Final Principle. Albedo stood as a Tower, too tall to grasped, for he was not simply the origin point, but the destination point of The All. Without him, there was no action. Without him, there was no Pure Act. Albedo was without the necessity of will, action, and causality, for he was the Greatest ‘I AM.’

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